Depot Lintel

Depot Lintel

Depot Lintel

 

Originally from Union Depot located at 630 S. High St., Muncie. The building was demolished in 1990 and the stone along with other artifacts were saved and given to the East Central Reinvestment Corp. which was leading the fight to save the station. ECRC has given the stone to the Cardinal Greenway for use in the Wysor Street Depot for display outside of the station.

Illumination

Illumination

The 7 foot bronze sculpture was created in 1998 by Delaware County artist Kenneth G. Ryden. A winged sprite-like figure balances gracefully on a symbolic stack of books. The sculpture depicts the dawn of understanding as revealed in the awakened human intelligence. The sculpture is located at the Daleville Public Library in Delaware County.

Kenneth G. Ryden is a professional sculptor who has created many public monuments for institutions and municipalities as well as custom bronzes for private collections. He maintains a studio at his Yorktown residence.

Growing through the Changes

Growing through the Changes

This bronze sculpture was presented to the citizens of Muncie by former Gallery 308. Through much hard work and devotion, the gallery was able to produce, install and donate the public art sculpture by artist Sally A. Myers. The artwork is located in front of the Muncie City Hall.

George McCulloch Memorial

George McCulloch Memorial

George McCulloch Memorial

 

A bronze sculpture by Leonard Crunelle (1872-1944) cast in 1915 and dedicated October 31, 1917. Base is of polished pink granite.

George McCulloch was the president of Muncie Foundry & Machine Company and the owner of the Muncie Morning Star newspaper. In 1901, George McCulloch donated the land which makes up McCulloch Park to the city. He specified that the land must be used as a public park for the free use by all people that lived in the city. A memorial to George McCulloch has been relocated at the park’s southern boundary along McCulloch Blvd., in a triangular traffic median in between McCulloch Park Dr.

Gazebo

Gazebo

William H. & Agnes Metzger Ball built one of the first homes in what became known as Westwood, a housing development in west Muncie. In 1939, the Balls attended the World’s Fair in New York. There they saw a wrought iron gazebo which was designed by an artist working for the Nashville Foundry in Nashville, Tennessee. The gazebo won first place in the category “Best Cast Iron Work of Art” at the fair. The Balls purchased the gazebo. The gazebo was given to Minnetrista and is now the focal point of the rose garden.