Alice Nichols

Alice Nichols

Alice Nichols

 

Created by artist Tuck Langl and commissioned by John Surovek. Bust honoring life, work, and teaching of professor Alice Nichols, a former chair of the university’s art department. Located at the north entrance of the Art Instruction Building on Ball State University campus. Installed in 2008

Appeal to the Great Spirit

Appeal to the Great Spirit

Appeal to the Great Spirit

 

The statue, owned by the City of Muncie, is a memorial to Edmund B. Ball. After his death in 1925, his family searched for a suitable memorial to him. They settled on a replica of the “Appeal to the Great Spirit” cast in bronze, and erected on a site just east of the Ball family homes on the north side of the White River in Muncie. The original sculpture was created by Cyrus Dallin in 1909 and is a Plains Indian. The statue and surrounding park were dedicated in 1929. The statue is located in a park at the corner of Walnut St. and Granville Ave.

The statue does not depict Chief Munsee. There is no indication that there ever was a chief named Munsee. In addition, the statue depicts a Plains Indian. The Indians who lived in or near Muncie were Woodland Indians.

Awakening Potential

Awakening Potential

Awakening Potential

 

This 8 1/2 foot tall bronze sculpture was created in 2006 by Delaware County artist Kenneth G. Ryden. the sculpture features a young girl and boy standing on a stump with tree sprouts emerging from their hands. The sprouting tree symbolizes the awakening potential that lies within a young person. Kenneth G. Ryden is a professional sculptor who has created many public monuments for institutions and municipalities as well as custom bronzes for private collections. He maintains a studio at his Yorktown residence.

For visitors to the Youth Opportunity Center west of Muncie, there is a plaza in the roundabout near the entrance. Within the plaza is the sculpture “Awakening Potential”

Beneficence

Beneficence

Beneficence

 

For over 80 years on campus, this bronze statue has become the symbol of Ball State University. It was the last commissioned work of renowned sculptor of his time Daniel Chester French (American 1850-1931), best known as the sculptor of the Abraham Lincoln statue in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. The settings and columns for Beneficence were designed by prominent East Coast architect Richard Henry Dana.

The statue was commissioned by the Muncie Chamber of Commerce as a public monument to the generosity of the Ball brothers, each of whom is represented by one of the five Corinthian columns. The bronze statue was completed in 1930 and installed in 1937.

 

 

Bison-Tennial Project – Neolin

Bison-Tennial Project – Neolin

Bison-Tennial

Delaware County Bison-Tennial project

Named: Neolin, the Lenape word for “Enlightened One”

The Bison-tennial Public Art Project was created by the Indiana Association of United Ways as a way to LIVE UNITED in celebrating Indiana’s bicentennial in 2016. United Way of Delaware County convened a committee to lead the project locally. This committee included key partners from the Muncie Arts & Culture Council, the Community Foundation of Muncie & Delaware County, City of Muncie, and Delaware County’s Bicentennial Activities Coordinator.

This project, made possible by a grant from the Community Foundation of Muncie & Delaware County, engaged community members with Muncie’s history and the state symbol. The 5’x 8′ bison is located at Tuhey Park.

Artist, Denise King
Lenape Native American design

 

Upcoming Events

Muncie Calendar

GET SOCIAL

Download the guide

Muncie Calendar

Local Coronavirus Hub info from

Delaware County Indiana Health Deparment.

Chick here for more info

 

Contact Us

765-284-2700
765-284-3002 (fax)

muncievisitorsbureau@gmail.com

www.visitmuncie.org

Business Hours: Monday thru Friday,

8:30a.m. to 4:30p.m.

 

 

Find Us

421 S Walnut St, Ste 100
Muncie, Indiana 47305
765-284-2700
Directions/Location

 

 

Bronze Water Baby

Bronze Water Baby

Bronze Water Baby

 

This sculpture, “Bronze Baby,” was originally on the site of the Frank C. Ball home. Margaret Ball Petty, daughter of Frank C. Ball, later owned the statue. It was created by Brenda Putnam in 1916. The sculpture is currently displayed, during warm weather, in the pool of the Children’s Garden at Minnetrista.